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Addiction can take a toll on your mental and physical wellbeing—and in the process, it can impede your professional success. For those with full-time jobs, then, addiction recovery is truly a necessity.

The problem is, recovery isn’t something you can achieve in a single weekend. It takes time—sometimes, a residential program can last 90 days or more. And when you have a busy and demanding profession, you likely don’t have that kind of time to spare.

Thus, a common conundrum: How can you deal with addiction and maintain your professional responsibilities? Here are just a few tips and suggestions from the Experience Recovery team.

It’s Not All Inpatient Treatment

The first thing to remember is that addiction rehabilitation is not one-size-fits-all. There are different programs available, and residential inpatient treatment is just one of them. There are other options, such as outpatient treatment and partial hospitalization, that can offer greater flexibility, accommodating school, work, and family commitments.

As you pursue addiction recovery, then, always ask about these different options. It may be that an outpatient program, requiring just a few hours per week, makes a lot more sense for your needs than a 24/7 rehab commitment.

Ask About Executive Recovery

Another option to consider is executive recovery, something that’s offered by many addiction rehab centers. Executive recovery is geared toward C-suite members who need to get well and get back to work pronto; thus, executive recovery is designed to be quick and discreet.

Executive record programs offer flexibility in a number of ways—not just a relatively brief time commitment, but also the ability to have your phone or computer with you when you’re in detox, allowing you to stay connected to the outside world. Again, it’s something to ask about as you pursue the best rehab plan to meet your physical and professional needs.

Know Your Rights

It’s also worth noting that you have certain legal protections available to you—for example, both the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act offer protection for those who suffer from addiction. These laws prohibit discrimination and will allow you to take the time off that you need to pursue rehab, without running the risk that you’ll get terminated.

Make sure you know your rights and understand how to claim these protections; speak with your company’s HR professional to learn more.

Stay Committed to Recovery

Again, it’s important to note that recovery is an ongoing process—and even once you leave rehab and return to “regular life,” you’ll want to keep taking care of yourself and working to prevent a relapse. There are a lot of components to this, but here are a few especially important tips:

    • Keep going to therapy appointments and support group meetings as advised by your addiction recovery specialist—even on days when you don’t feel like you “need” it.
    • Keep your relapse recovery plan handy, and review it with your therapist on a regular basis.
    • Even with a busy professional life, take time to eat right, get plenty of sleep, and relieve stress as needed.

Get Well, and Get Back to Work

Addiction recovery is an investment in the rest of your life—and that includes your working life. Pursuing recovery can make you far more energized, creative, and productive in your day-to-day affairs. In short, it can help you achieve at an even higher level.

Learn more about what it takes to seek recovery while maintaining your professional responsibilities. Reach out to Experience Recovery in Orange County, California, with any questions!